Will Bengaluru become uninhabitable in the upcoming years due to a water crisis?

While witnessing scorching heat, Bengaluru is undergoing acute water crisis.

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Will Bengaluru become uninhabitable in the upcoming years due to a water crisis?
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The rising issue

The freshly amended master plan of Bengaluru, issued by the Bangalore Development Authority (BDA), anticipates that the population of the city will continue to increase and will hit the mark of 20.3 million in 2031. As per the research of IISc, its population continues to expand at an appalling rate which is exerting immense pressure on the city’s natural resources.

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Whitefield, Bellandur, and HSR Layout are among the significant zones which are affected by this. The Cauvery water which is delivered to more than half of the city is not enough. This is because of the law passed by the supreme government which restricts water supplies to the town. Another contributing factor is the inappropriate city planning, the newly developed zones are left to survive on borewells and tablets. A research conducted by Indian Institute of Human Settlements strikes out the ever decreasing availability of per capita groundwater. In the year 1951, it was about 14,180 liters a day which dropped down to 5,120 liters in. 2001 and by 2025 it will drop further to 3,670.

The co-founder of Coalition for Water Security, Sandeep Anirudhan, describes this situation as an emergency, which needs to be tackled as early as possible. He says that the supplies of water have been continuously auctioned to the highest bidder in most areas of the town. The borewells have hit the depth mark of 1,500 feet (0.46 km) and even below.

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As per a report, issued by a private water supplier of Bengaluru, Ramesh Reddy, the water demand for water has increased at a drastic rate as borewells are dehydrating. The major issue is the level of underground water is drying up as a result no water can be extracted from borewells. This is disturbing the demand-supply equilibrium.

The call of the situation

April did witness some intermittent rain showers but was not sufficient as Bengaluru is a rocky and parched land, didn’t store the rainwater in the form of groundwater.

Every year, the combination of water deficiencies and population surplus is making it difficult for the government to make sure constant water is supplied.

Residents and the government requires joining hands for this cause and working towards restricting Bengaluru to replicate water shortage tales of Cape Town.

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Will Bengaluru become uninhabitable in the upcoming years due to a water crisis?
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While witnessing scorching heat, Bengaluru is undergoing acute water crisis.
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The Policy Times