2050 Climate Change City Index

Data shows how temperature changes, water shortages and rising sea levels may impact some of the world’s most popular cities in the next three decades.

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2050 Climate Change City Index-The Policy Times
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Data shows how temperature changes, water shortages and rising sea levels may impact some of the world’s most popular cities in the next three decades

  • Bangkok, Thailand may experience the greatest climate change by 2050, with the highest risk of flooding from rising sea-levels and a temperature increase of 1.67°C.
  • Nairobi, Kenya may experience the biggest overall climate shift by 2050, moving from a Temperate Humid Warm Summer climate to a Tropical Savanna Wet Summer climate type, and a 2.31°C temperature increase.
  • Melbourne, Australia may experience the greatest water stress increase, where demand will be double the supply by 2040.
  • Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and Amsterdam, Netherlands are the 2nd and 3rd cities respectively potentially set to experience the greatest climate shift by 2050.

Berlin, Germany, January 2020—A study revealing how the climate will shift by 2050 in major cities around the globe has been released by the apartment rentals platform, Nestpick.com. Climate change is at the forefront of many people’s minds, but most especially Millennials, Gen-Zs, and the forthcoming younger generations. Shifting weather patterns will have the largest impact on the upcoming demographics’ lives, and will likely be a deciding factor for where they ultimately choose to settle.

Read more: Climate change eating away Himalayan glaciers twice as fast

To understand how some of the most popular cities in the world will be affected by climate change, the apartment platform set out to determine how potential temperature shifts, water shortages, and rising sea levels could impact our planet in the next twenty to thirty years. Nestpick hopes that this study will not only help those looking to relocate to make informed decisions about how climate change may impact their chosen city but also add to the growing debate about how the correct legislation and safeguarding procedures can be put in place to ensure the longevity and liveability of these cities.

How the study was conducted:

Before beginning the study, it was important for Nestpick to acknowledge the difficulty of climate change prediction, and the added challenge of presenting climate data in a way that is easily understandable. To undertake this challenge, several existing research methodologies from established climate change experts and reports were consulted to build the framework for the research. These include Jean-Francois Bastin, an Ecologist at the University of Ghent, the Koppen-Geiger climate classification system, the World Resources Institute data on water shortages, and more.

Read more: Climate change on track to create food insecurity in India?

A list of 85 cities featured in top tourist destinations lists for Gen Z and Millennials, and which were also covered in these existing studies, was then finalized. Looking at climate categorization, average temperature, sea-level changes and water stress, the cities which are predicted to experience the highest and lowest climate change shift between now and 2050 were determined.

 


This is an excerpt from the full press release. Since this document exceeds the limit allowed via email, please visit this link to view the PDF version of the entire press release: https://sweetspotpr.com/wp-content/uploads/Nestpick/CCH2019/Delhi.pdf. If you prefer to receive the file as an attachment, let me know and I can send it to you in response. 

To view the results and full methodology of the study, please refer to the results page here: https://www.nestpick.com/2050-climate-change-city-index/


Summary
Article Name
2050 Climate Change City Index
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Data shows how temperature changes, water shortages and rising sea levels may impact some of the world’s most popular cities in the next three decades.

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