Children Learn about Anger Management Early from Their Parents

In an exclusive interview with Nitish Raj of The Policy Times, Dr. Amrita Basu (Misra), ENT Specialist, Head-Neck surgeon and Author talks about what it means for “being mom”, nurturing kids, work-life-balance, anger management, birth control and what does she mean by Mompreneurs

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Children Learn about Anger Management Early from Their Parents
SensageOnline

Dr. Amrita Basu (Misra) is an ENT and Head Neck surgeon. She is currently working at a Medical College, wife of a pediatrician and mother of a tricky preschooler. She is a popular blogger. She discovered how blogging appears to make the world a better place. Most blogs which are successful are making money, but they all really have amazing content and that is truly inspiring. So many people with different problems, dreams, talents, all are trying to help in their own way. By helping others they are not only improving their karma but are also striving towards Financial Freedom!

She has authored a couple of books including “Fruits for life”, “Picky Eaters” and “How do you teach the value of money to your kids,” etc.

In an exclusive interview with Nitish Raj of The Policy Times, Dr. Amrita Basu (Misra), ENT Specialist, Head-Neck surgeon, Author talks about what it means for “being mom”, nurturing kids, work-life-balance, anger management, birth control and what does she mean by Mompreneurs.

Q. Often being mom is today seen as a responsibility rather than a privilege by the young moms. Is it a sign of our modernism or degrading culture?

AB: I don’t know about either. I just know it’s a blessing. Being a mother helped me realize the “why” of life and the purpose I have. Motherhood is a journey of getting to know yourself from inside out.

Q. How much the modern lifestyle of moms have created a problem in the rearing of new child even though they claim to be highly conscious regarding their child?

AB: (Not sure what parts of modern lifestyle you mean) Mothers if maintaining healthy lifestyle, not smoking or drinking and no substance abuse then major goals are in place. Fast food and eating out may be managed strictly for healthy children. I have written about childhood obesity in this context.

Q. You have talked about anger management for moms. Is it an involuntary transformation in the new moms or they have to really fight hard especially if the girl have been short-tempered?

AB: My mom used to get angry too! And that was some time back. Most moms get angry trying to cope. Children learn about anger management early from their parents. So both parents need to be careful about expressing and managing anger in front of kids.

Q. People talk a lot about nutrients in diet. How much nutritious fruits are important for a good health rather than preventive healthcare?

AB: Extraordinarily important. Whole fruits and vegetables in diet prevent 90% of lifestyle diseases. Physical and mental health are both intrinsically related to diet and lifestyle.

Q. Working women are always loaded with a boatload of guilt for not taking proper care of their child. Is their shortage of time really for these moms or they have been a prey of general perception?

AB: All women are juggling too many roles. We want a home, a family, a career and why not? Men it have allthe time for generations. No one told them to choose. Why do we have to choose? Biologically and socially we have certain responsiblities. So work culture, corporates, governments need to make work from home, remote work more of an option for all who need it. Including single fathers!

Q. You have talked about contraceptives for birth control. What are the likely reasons we opt to sterilization primarily rather than contraception?

AB: It’s the government policy! It is easier for government to implement (or so they think!). No woman would voluntarily undergo surgery if easier options are made popular and incentivized. Also a majority of the women who need help are under the control of their families. No free will, choice or opportunity for informed decisions.

Q. You have frequently mentioned the term “Mompreneurs” in your blogs. Does it have specifically anything to do with working moms or it applies for the women in general?

AB: After I became a mom I felt torn. I wanted to be there for my daughter, enjoy all the moments with her. I also didn’t wanted to stop being a doctor. (I studied pretty long to be one). This is something all moms face to some extent. That’s why I fell in love with the word mompreneur. We are not just women entrepreneurs. We are women whose dreams, ambitions are wrapped around the live of little ones. That’s the core around which everything get shaped.

Q. What are your next initiative in creating the moms around the world?

AB: I want to find what works. What works for moms who want to do something from home. They are educated, have passion, want to help people. But stuck by circumstances and society. Writing books and coaching moms are on my current list.