Education Emergency: Over 9.5 million children may never go back to schools after the Covid-19 crisis

Inger Ashing, Chief Executive of ‘Save the Children’ charity said, “Around 10 million children may never return to school - this is an unpredictable education emergency and governments must urgently invest in learning.”

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Education Emergency: Over 9.5 million children may never go back to schools after the Covid-19 crisis . The policy times

Due to coronavirus pandemic schools are still facing hard to open safely, has now caused an unpredictable education emergency as up to 9.5 million kids may never go back to schools.

A British charity, Save the Children warned on Monday, quoted UNESCO data showing that in April 1.6 million kids were shut out of schools and universities in a bid to counter the coronavirus crisis- About 90% of the globe’s entire student population, which is a big number.

According to a new report by Save the Children, ‘Save Our Children’ said, “For the first time in human history, entire generations of children globally have had their education disrupted.”

The British charity at the same time also warned that aftermath and during the recovery from the virus, an additional 90 to 117 million kids could be forced into poverty due to economic crisis, which in turn even reduce students attending the school. As because of economic and social factors, many young people required to work, or in many cases girls may be forced to early marriage to support their families, this could see between 7 and 9.7 million children will be dropped out of schools permanently.

The charity said that already before the crisis, around 258 million children and adolescents were missing out of school.

Additionally, the charity also mentioned that the coronavirus crisis could also result in losses of $77 billion in the education sector and less stipulation in the budget, increasing the crisis in the low and middle-income countries by the end of 2021.

Inger Ashing, Chief Executive of the charity said, “Around 10 million children may never return to school – this is an unpredictable education emergency and governments must urgently invest in learning.”

“Instead we are at a risk of unparalleled budget cuts which will see existing inequality explode between the rich and the poor, and between boys and girls”, Ashing further said.


Urged for funds in the education sector

The charity also stressed the urgent need to pump more money into the educational sector especially in developing countries and urged the government and donors to invest more funds so that students can come back to schools and till then to support.

Ashing said, “We know the poorest most marginalized children who were already the furthest behind have suffered the great losses, with no access to distance learning-or any kind of education-for half an academic year.”

Save the Children charity also urged commercial creditors to suspend debt repayments for low-income countries- as the move could free up $14 billion for education programs.

 “If we allow this education crisis to unfold, the impact on children’s futures will be long lasting,” Ashing added.

Citing the United Nations goal, she further said, “The promise the world has made to ensure all children have access to a quality education by 2030, will be set back by years.”

The report listed 12 countries where children are most at risk of mass school attrition. The countries are- Niger, Afghanistan, Guinea, Nigeria, Pakistan, Mauritania, Yemen, Mali, Chad, Liberia, Pakistan, Senegal, and Ivory Coast.

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Education Emergency: Over 9.5 million children may never go back to schools after the Covid-19 crisis
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Inger Ashing, Chief Executive of ‘Save the Children’ charity said, “Around 10 million children may never return to school - this is an unpredictable education emergency and governments must urgently invest in learning.”
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THE POLICY TIMES
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