Looking back to the trend of Cultural Genocide in China & how culture practice cost lives dreadfully

There are many countries around the Globe that people think are republic and united but to the contrary, there is inhumanity prevailing in these countries. An enumeration of people with cultural, religious, or ethnic crores they circle, finding a thread of the commonality, some form of patriotism. But the people that constitute a country aren’t always whom we expect them to be, or whom we are told they should be.

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There are many countries around the Globe that people think are republic and united but to the contrary, there is inhumanity prevailing in these countries. An enumeration of people with cultural, religious, or ethnic crores they circle, finding a thread of the commonality, some form of patriotism. But the people that constitute a country aren’t always whom we expect them to be, or whom we are told they should be.

Cultural Genocide – The Trend & Accusation 

Cultural Genocide means the elimination of a group’s identity, through measures such as forcibly transferring children away from their families, restricting the use of a national language, banning cultural activities, or destroying schools religious institutions or memorial sites. Cultural Genocide is not a defined crime in international law. Although it was discussed at length during the drafting of the 1948 Genocide Convention, the distinction between physical and cultural genocide did not make it into the final document. Of the action that might qualify as cultural genocide, only the forcible transfer of Children is criminalized.

China is accused of the Cultural Genocide and the Tibet officials have requested the UNHRC (United Nations Human Rights Commission) to look into the matter and save the people of Tibet and other regions under the control of China. The Tibetan government has urged all the countries to come together and force China to fulfill its obligation of Human rights before it is too late. “We strongly urge the UNHRC and members states to hold a special session to evaluate the human rights violations being carried out by China and to establish a country mandate of UN special rapporteur on China to monitor, analyze and report annually on the Human rights situation in Tibet and other regions under the People’s Republic of China”, CTA president Lobsang Sangay said in one of his statement.

A Story Overview

One of the Chinese doctors who was also involved in this harrowing crime, told to the newspaper after leaving China, that he used to think that he is doing national duty by carrying out the organs and killing the enemies as he was told so, but later he realized that he has been committing murder and heinous crime for so many years under the blanket of national duty.


He told that only two things are prevailing in the mind of the Chinese government, Money, and Cultural genocide. Chinese military or other officials used to shoot any person from the culturally biased region and he\she is taken to the hospital. Doctors who are the trained robots in the form of humans, operate (without giving anesthesia) and takes out the required organ from that innocent person’s body. Moreover, no compensation is given to that person in any form. The person is not even aware of the form of consent in which they have agreed or showed their will to donate their organ.

He also told that it is a multi-billion dollar business and they make a lot of money from selling only one Human organ. He added that “if you go to China today and ask for an organ, it is most likely that one innocent person is going to pay the cost for you”.

The main target of Chinese police and government is Muslim Uighur Minority, whose loyalty the central government has long distrusted for both nationalist and religious reasons.

The disturbing relationship has a very long history and it further accentuated in 2009 when Uighur protests led to violent riots and a retaliatory crackdown. Hundreds died in the clashed or were disappeared by security forces in their aftermath. Uighur is a problem for China perhaps an intractable one. They are reluctant subjects of the Chinese state, they sit on the route most key to Xi Jinping’s signature belt and road initiative and increasing oppression has so far only prompted further resistance.

Cultural Effects

In 2005, Human Rights Watch reported that “information scattered in official sources suggests that retaliation” against mosques not sponsored by the Chinese state was prevalent and that the Xinjiang party secretary expresses that Uyghurs “should not have to build new places for religious activities”. The Chinese government prohibited minors from participating in religious activities in Xinjing in a matter that, according to Human Rights Watch, “Has no basis in Chinese law”.

Documents that were leaked to the ‘The New York Times’ by an anonymous Chinese official advised that “Students should not ask whether their missing parents had committed a crime, they are to be told no, it is just their thinking has been infected by unhealthy thoughts. Freedom is only possible when this virus in their thinking is eradicated and they are in good health”.

According to Radio Free Asia, the Chinese government jailed Uyghur Imam Abdulheber Ahmet after he took his son to a religious school not sanctioned by the Chinese state. Ahmet had previously been lauded by China as a “five-state” imam but was sentenced in 2018 to over five years in prison for his action.

These precedents set off alarm bells about how things might play out in Xinjiang. China’s actions reveal a clear intent to eradicate the perceived threat the Uighur identity poses to state security. It is currently employing the highest-cost strategy available in pursuit of this aim. If this proves too difficult, it is more likely that it will default to an easier approach than abandon its goals- with fatal consequences.

Is Culture Practice Worth a Life?

A country is known for its states, states are known for its cities and ultimately cities are known for its people, its citizens. If the citizens are not happy the country cannot prosper and to make people happy should be the main aim of the ruler. But, in China, it is the opposite.

Cultural genocide may not be a crime the international law, but it murders the sentiments of people. It kills them internally and it should be included in international law. How can people survive when they are now allowed to practice their culture and if they do so they have to pay the price of their life? It is the height of inhumanity and thus the United Nations Human Rights Commission should come forward to help these people of China.

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Looking back to the trend of Cultural Genocide in China & how culture practice cost lives dreadfully
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There are many countries around the Globe that people think are republic and united but to the contrary, there is inhumanity prevailing in these countries. An enumeration of people with cultural, religious, or ethnic crores they circle, finding a thread of the commonality, some form of patriotism. But the people that constitute a country aren’t always whom we expect them to be, or whom we are told they should be.
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THE POLICY TIMES
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