Overseas Citizenship of India Scheme

0
0

Because of persevering requests for “double citizenship” especially from the Diaspora in North America and other created nations and keeping in view the Government’s profound responsibility to­wards satisfying the desires and assumptions for Over­seas Indians, the Overseas Citizenship of India (OCI) Scheme was presented by revising the Citizenship Act, 1955 in August 2005. The Scheme was sent off during the Pravasi Bharatiya Divas show 2006 at Hyderabad. The Scheme accommodates enrolment as Overseas Citizen of India (OCI) of all Persons of Indian Origin (PIOs) who were residents of India on 26th January 1950 or there later or were qualified to become resi­dents of India on 26th January 1950 with the exception of who is or had been a resident of Pakistan, Bangladesh or such other country as the Central Government may, by notice in the Official Gazette, determine.

Also Read: Sun never sets on Indians, the spirit of Overseas Indians working for Global growth

OCI isn’t to be misinterpreted as dual citizenship’. OCI doesn’t give political rights. The enlisted Overseas Cit­izens of India will not be qualified for the freedoms presented on a resident of India under article 16 of the Constitution concerning fairness of chance in issues of public work.

FEATURES:

  • Parity with Non-Resident Indians in the matter of inter-country adoption of Indian children.
  • Parity with resident Indian nationals in matters of tariffs in domestic air faires.
  • Parity with domestic Indian visitors in respect of entry fee for visiting national parks and wildlife sanctuaries in India.
  • Parity with non-resident Indians in respect
  • Entry fees for visiting the national monuments, historical sites and museums in India.

Practicing the following professions in India, in pursuance of the provisions contained in the relevant Acts, namely:

  • Doctors, dentists, nurses and pharmacists
  • Advocates
  • Architects and
  • Chartered Accountants
  • Entitlement to appear for the All India Pre-Medical Test or such other tests to make them eligible for admission in pursuance of the provisions contained in the relevant Acts.

As online OCI Miscellaneous help is currently accessi­ble for re-issuance/issuance of copy OCI archive, where appropriate, difference in private specifics, viz, identity, name, change of address/occupation, etc. What’s more, misfortune/harm of OCI enlistment endorsement/visa.

The GoI, further loosened up the OCI rules by getting rid of obligatory prerequisite of re-issuance of an OCI card each time new visa is given to an outsider up to 20 years old and once subsequent to finishing 50 years old. Presently, OCI cardholder is expected to get the OCI card re-gave just once when another identification is given in the wake of finishing 20 years old. In any case, OCI cardholder is expected to transfer Online a dupli­cate of the new visa and a most recent photograph each time another identification is given up to 20 years old and once subsequent to finishing 50 years old.

Taking into account the continuous COVID-19 pan­demic, Timeline for re-issuance of OCI cards. were fun­damental, has additionally been transitory stretched out until 31st December 2022.

REGISTRATION OF OVERSEAS CITIZENS OF IN­DIA

The Central Government may, subject to such conditions and restrictions as may be prescribed, on an ap­plication made in this behalf, register as an overseas citizen of India

  • Any person of full age and capacity,
  • Who is citizen of another country, but was a citi­zen of India at the time of, or at any time after, the commencement of the Constitution,
  • Who is citizen of another country, but was eligible to become a citizen of India at the time of the com­mencement of the Constitution,
  • Who is citizen of another country, but belonged to a territory that become part of India after the 15th day of August 1947,
  • Who is a child or a grand-child of such a citizen,
  • A person, who is a minor child of a person men­tioned in clause (a): Provided that no person, who is or had been a citizen of Pakistan, Bangladesh or such other country as the Central Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, specify, shall be eligible for registration as an overseas citizen of Republic of India.

RENUNCIATION OF OVERSEAS CITIZENSHIP

  • If any overseas citizen of India of full age and capac­ity makes in the prescribed manner a declaration renouncing his overseas citizenship of India, the declaration shall be registered by the Central Gov­ernment, and upon such registration, that person shall cease to be an overseas citizen of India.
  • Where a person ceases to be an overseas citizen of India under subsection (1), every minor child of that person registered as an overseas citizen of In­dia, shall thereupon cease to be an overseas citizen of India.

IMPLICATIONS OF NATIONAL SECURITY

The Overseas Citizenship scheme can be a bit of a threat to national security but with better precautions and rules it can be nicely avoided. It is basic to cause to notice the talk on public safety that occurred simultaneously. The global repercussions of the psychological oppressor assaults of September 11, 2001, in New York particu­larly the UN Security Council Resolution 137310 and counterterrorism regulations in the USA and the UK as well as assaults on the Jammu and Kashmir Assem­bly in October 2001and the attack on the Indian Par­liament working in December 2001, drove the Indian Parliament to pass the draconian Prevention of Terror­ism Act (POTA) in March 2002 (Kalhan et al.2006). On 18 December 2003, four days after the reception of the OCI regulation, an amendment of POTA was embraced by the decision National Democratic Alliance (NDA) alliance, provoking a walkout of all resistance groups, which requested to nullify the whole regulation. Sub­sequently, during the time the first regulation on OCI was taken on, the subjects of public safety and shields against terrorist exercises were exceptionally conspicu­ous for strategy producers. Thus, policy and lawmakers must keep such things in mind to prevent any sort of threat to national security.

CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION AS OVER­SEAS CITIZEN OF INDIA

The Central Government certainly can, by order, cancel the registration granted under sub-section(1) of section 7A if it believes that

  • The registration as an overseas citizen of India was obtained by means of fraud, false representation or the concealment of any material
  • The overseas citizen of India has shown disaffection towards the Constitution of
  • The overseas citizen of India has, during any war in which India may bee engaged, unlawfully traded or communicated with an enemy or been engaged in, or associated with, any business or commercial ac­tivity that was to his knowledge carried on in such manner as to assist an enemy in that
  • The overseas citizen of India has, within five years after registration under sub-section(1) of section 7A has been sentenced to imprisonment for a term of not less than two
  • It is necessary so to do in the interest of the sover­eignty and integrity of India, the security of India, friendly relations of India with any foreign country, or in the interests of the general Public.