Women resort to social media to request assistance as the country falls under the Taliban rule

Millions of young Afghan girls and women face a bleak future as the country falls into the hands of religious extremist militias. Many educated Afghan women have resorted to social media to get assistance and vent their frustrations.

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Women resorts to social media to request assistance as the country falls under the Taliban rule

Millions of young Afghan girls and women face a bleak future as the country falls into the hands of religious extremist militias. In the northern province of Balkh, the Taliban reportedly killed a young lady for wearing tight clothing and without being accompanied by a male relative.

Several stories have surfaced in recent weeks claiming that the Taliban has given directives for men and women, including what they can wear, what they are permitted to wear, and what they are not allowed to wear.

Also Read: India announces a new category of visa for Afghans

According to reports, Taliban fanatics shot and killed a 21-year-old woman in the terrorist group’s held town of Samar Qandian. Taliban established new laws and regulations in July after taking areas in the Afghan Takhar region, including prohibiting women from leaving home without a male relative and ordering males to grow beards.

According to civil society groups in Afghanistan’s northern province of Takhar, have commanded males to grow beards, barred women from leaving home alone, and imposed dowry rules on girls.

These events are a warning sign that some of the rights gained by Afghan women in the 20 years after the hardline Islamist militant movement was deposed may be rescinded.

No basic human rights for women

Women were not permitted to work, girls were not allowed to attend school, and women had to conceal their faces and be escorted by a male relative if they wished to leave their houses when they last governed Afghanistan, from 1996 to 2001.

Under the Taliban’s rigid interpretation of Islamic law, women who violated the prohibitions were sometimes humiliated and beaten in public by the religious police.

During the Taliban’s tenure in Afghanistan, women were frequently publicly flogged or killed. During previously unsuccessful discussions towards a political solution in recent years, Taliban officials promised the West that women would have equal rights under Islam, including the opportunity to work and receive an education. In a spate of assaults, Afghan women working in sectors such as media, healthcare, and law enforcement have been slain.

Some others are afraid that Taliban fighters would barge into their houses and hold them accountable for their actions during the last 14 years.

Women have resorted to social media to request assistance

According to a study released by Human Rights Watch in June 2020, despite the Taliban’s public assertion that it no longer opposes girls’ education, very few Taliban leaders actually allow females to attend school past adolescence.

Amnesty International has previously documented that under the Taliban era, the great majority of marriages in Afghanistan were forced.

Many educated Afghan women have resorted to social media to get assistance and vent their frustrations.

“With every city that collapses, human bodies, dreams, history, and the future collapse, art and culture collapse, life and beauty collapse, our world disintegrate,” Afghan photographer Rada Akbar said on Twitter.

Noted Sahraa Karimi, an Afghan filmmaker, has written an open letter to the world, urging it to recognize the consequences of the Taliban’s quick conquest of Afghanistan. Karimi appealed for filmmakers and women, in general, to be protected from the ruthless extremists who have taken over the nation.

In her letter, Karimi pleaded with the film community to join her “in protecting my beautiful people, especially filmmakers from the Taliban.”

(News: India Times)

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Women resort to social media to request assistance as the country falls under the Taliban rule
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Millions of young Afghan girls and women face a bleak future as the country falls into the hands of religious extremist militias. Many educated Afghan women have resorted to social media to get assistance and vent their frustrations.
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THE POLICY TIMES
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